When children and teens struggle with depression, anxiety, and stress, their whole family is affected. Yet, as many as 80% of kids with behavioral health needs don’t get the help they deserve.  LOHF donors share our mission to change this in Lancaster County.

We provide a safety net of support for families by strengthening and connecting successful programs and care providers. Our strategic support includes: a grants program, training for doctors and therapists, copay assistance, nursing scholarships, and NavWell—a revolutionary system to help doctors, therapists, families, and schools collaborate for children’s wellbeing.

Join us in this mission TODAY—during The ExtraOrdinary Give—with a gift on our leaderboard page at extragive.org.

Your help will be multiplied by the ExtraGive stretch pool during Lancaster County’s largest day of giving, which ends at midnight tonight. Thank you!

Thanks to our donors, LOHF is announces recipients of Fall 2017 community grants.

LOHF this week approved funding to five Lancaster County community benefit organizations for children’s behavioral health programs.

  • CHI St. Joseph Children’s Health: $15,000 for “The Patchwork Quilt- A family-focused approach to children’s behavioral health and psychiatric care” to support 600 children and 1,200 family members with counseling and therapy.
  • Community Action Partnership of Lancaster County: $13,000 for “Minimizing trauma for children of justice-involved parents through a trauma-informed justice system” to train 288 community members (primarily police, probation and parole officers) with the RMO to safeguard children of arrested parents.
  • Compass Mark: $10,000 for “Family Services Advocate, supporting the unique needs of children with incarcerated parents” to support 100 children, 150 family members and 150 community members with coordinated care and case management.
  • Samaritan Counseling Center: $15,000 for “TeenHope” to help 2,250 children, 6,750 family members, and 50 community members with depression and anxiety screenings in schools and follow up to access mental health services.
  • Community Action Partnership of Lancaster County: $14,500 for “Linking positive and proactive social/emotional wellbeing strategies from school to home” to support 130 children, 105 family members and 28 community members with high quality, affordable childcare for children ages birth to 3 years old and their families in Head Start with positive behavior interventions and supports.

“We are very excited and humbled by this opportunity,” said Melanie Snyder, Director of the RMO at Community Action Partnership. “And we’re so grateful for the support of LOHF to help us carry out this important initiative to minimize trauma to the children of justice-involved parents in our community.”

“Our Family Services Advocate program continues to expand, thanks in part to LOHF and other important community partners,” said Eric Kennel, Executive Director of Compass Mark.

LOHF partners with Lancaster County community benefit organizations through its grants program, investing in work that impacts these areas:

  • Care Coordination: Improve the delivery of children’s behavioral healthcare services.
    • Increase access to mental/behavioral health services
    • Seamless transition of services for young adults
    • Coordinate resources to support families in navigating and accessing care
  • Parent/Caregiver Education: Enhance the capacity of parents, families, and caregivers through training and support.
    • Increase competency in addressing children’s mental/behavioral needs
    • Increase understanding and confidence in parents using strength-based techniques
    • Decrease need for care coordination
  • Access to Providers: Improve capacity of providers to support and treat children.
    • Reduce wait times for behavioral healthcare
    • Increase number of children who have and utilize health insurance
    • Encourage well-child visits and preventative care
    • Expand number and frequency of behavioral/mental health screenings in primary care

More Funds Available in 2018

An additional $100,000 in grant funds will be available for the 2018 Children’s Behavioral Health Grant program, focused on improving children’s behavioral health in Lancaster County. Online applications are now available, and due March 1, 2018. To learn more, please visit www.lohf.org/grants.

We encourage you to please contact the staff at LOHF to discuss any questions about your program before you apply. We will be glad to assist you in the process.

About the LOHF Children’s Behavioral Health Grant Program

LOHF asks applicants select at least one outcome from our logic model list and describe how the program will achieve that outcome. We ask applicants to describe the resources and inputs, activities, and outputs that your program will accomplish to achieve the intended result.

We support programs that are evidence-based, proven to work with some best practice, and seek to take these programs to scale, expand what works, and encourage applicants to replicate existing models from outside Lancaster County and within. We encourage applicants to work collaboratively with partners to learn more about improving services for children and families to achieve mental well-being.

All applicants are strongly encouraged to contact LOHF staff to discuss the grant program before submitting an application.

LOHF targets support towards evidence-based programs that advance mental wellness of children and youth in Lancaster County. Our Community Grant Program is a specific funding area that represents 26% of our annual program budget ($100,000 total funds available annually) with the goal of providing more funds each year through fundraising efforts. Tax exempt community benefit organizations serving Lancaster County are eligible to apply.

Guest Post by Jeimary Ramos Malave, RN and LOHF Scholarship Recipient

This month I assisted in my first delivery of a refugee patient’s baby at Women & Babies Hospital. My Spanish-speaking patient arrived in the U.S. just 8 months ago. We connected well as soon as I walked into the room because of our shared language and culture. I was able to help her through labor. She had a beautiful delivery and was so thankful that I was able to help her and her husband.

For 7 years, I had waited for this exact moment—to be able to connect with a patient and provide quality care through the barriers she was faced. I was grateful that I was able to give this family a positive birth experience. I felt empowered that I was able to take care of her to that capacity. I left the room thinking of all of the years it took me to achieve the goal of becoming a registered nurse.

As a nurse, I get to meet strangers and help them welcome their babies into the world during one of their happiest times. I get to assist the young mom who is afraid to give birth and the mom who has dealt with infertility. Some days are filled with joy and other days are filled with grief and sadness. As an RN, I am able to care for others and teach patients about their bodies and how they work.

Detoured and disappointed

I faced many obstacles and detours in my journey to nursing, but I was determined. In 2010, I graduated high school and attended Bloomsburg University. I felt I could conquer the world.  I got a job to help with books and living expenses while trying to excel in rigorous science courses.  After 2 years, I had taken all of my pre-requisites for the nursing program but was denied acceptance. I was also pregnant with my first daughter.

I was faced with a decision: drop out, change majors, or go back home and raise my daughter. I tried to imagine my life choosing another major other than nursing but nothing had an impact on me. I decided to go home. Now, I was a young mom with no college degree barely making ends meet, but I didn’t give up. I transferred my credits to the LPN program at Lancaster County Career and Technology Center. I told myself that if I could excel in this program with a small child, then surely I would be able to continue on to become an RN.

As an LPN, my detour helped others

I passed my boards and started my first job at SouthEast Lancaster Health Services, initially doing prenatal phone nursing. After 6 months, I was offered the position of Women’s Health LPN, responsible for following up with abnormal cervical cancer screenings and making sure that women were attending their follow up appointments. I was also responsible for coordinating a women’s group to teach refugee women over 50 about mammograms and pap smears. Eventually, I became Lead LPN of the Women’s Health Department, using my nursing skills to help train medical assistants and other LPNs in prenatal care. I also helped rewrite policies for the Women’s Health Department and help it department take on the Title 10 fund to help patients to access birth control.

From defeated to determined, thanks to LOHF scholarship

But even after 3 ½ successful and fulfilling years at SELHS, I longed to become an RN. I applied to PA College of Health Sciences after being at SELHS for a year. But I got nervous when an advisor told me that the program was too rigorous for me to handle while parenting a 6-month-old, and that the chances I would be accepted would be slim to none. I withdrew my application, feeling defeated again.

A year later, I still couldn’t shake the desire to finish what I started at Bloomsburg University, so I reapplied to the LPN- RN bridge program. I was offered conditional acceptance!

There were still going to be challenges, especially a financial one. I applied for a scholarship from LOHF, and they awarded me the opportunity to fulfill my dream! The LOHF scholarship was the final push I needed to make my journey to become an RN possible.

In May of this year (2017), I graduated with an Associate degree, a 3.2 GPA, and promotion to the BSN program! I have also moved on from SELHS to become a labor and delivery nurse at LGH/Penn Medicine Women & Babies Hospital.

Nursing is a reward worth the challenge

My advice to others who dream of becoming a nurse, is that you must be passionate about it. You must be willing to do whatever it takes to make that dream a reality, whether it’s retaking a science course to boost your GPA, or waiting another year to start a program.  I was faced with a lot of hurdles in my journey. I had to look at the big picture and make sure the decisions I was making would have a positive impact on my children. And there were many days when I wanted to give up and be complacent with my life.

As nurses, we hold the lives of many people in our hands, and it is the humanness of our patients that bring us to work every single day. We are able to meet our patients where they are in their vulnerability during their happiest and saddest times. We are able to build trust, educate, and empower our patients and leave them better than they were.

If you are on a journey to nursing, think of what nursing means to you and what you can offer the community through it. This kind of impact is why LOHF supports nursing in Lancaster County through scholarships like mine.

Mental Health Copay Assistance is a program of LOHF that provides copay assistance for the behavioral healthcare needs of those who cannot afford it.

Formerly known as PALCO (Project Access Lancaster County), it transitioned in July 2017 from being an independent nonprofit to a program of LOHF.  PALCO was founded in 2007 with the mission to improve the healthcare of Lancaster County residents by increasing access to quality healthcare providers. From 2007-2015, volunteer PALCO healthcare providers contributed a staggering $47.8 million of donated medical care. In April 2015, PALCO ended its volunteer program of donated medical service for the uninsured (largely due to the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion in Pennsylvania to provide medical insurance) and transitioned to become a copay program.

Collaborative Community Partnership

Since 2015, PALCO has participated as a grant recipient in the application with Lancaster General Health/Penn Medicine to the United Way of Lancaster County for “Let’s Talk, Lancaster: Changing the conversation about mental health.”

This collaborative partnership has funded this key program for those in our community who need mental health care, but cannot afford copays and premiums. LOHF is now the recipient of this grant in a collaboration of resources and experience to continue this vital program and reach more people in need.

“Because the co-pay and premium assistance program PALCO was previously managing aligns so naturally with the LOHF mission of improving behavioral health services, it was only fitting we take this over,” said LOHF Board Chair, Shawn Barron. “So many people in need rely on this program to help them make ends meet; it would be detrimental not to continue this.”

How to Apply

Contact Lisa Riffanacht at (717) 392-1595 or lisa_palco@comcast.net for more information or to have an application mailed to you. You may also download it at lohf.org/mental-health-copay-assistance/.

The Lancaster Osteopathic Health Foundation (LOHF) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2017 Nurse Education Scholarship. The purpose of the Nurse Education Scholarship Program is to strengthen the capacity of healthcare professionals in Lancaster County by supporting nursing students.

This year, LOHF invested $63,000 in the education of 22 local nursing students; this includes 19 new scholarship recipients and 3 previous recipients who are continuing in a second or third year of their degree program. Since 2003, LOHF has invested over $817,250 in the education of 355 nurses who can be found caring for our family members, friends and neighbors.

“We are thrilled to be able to assist healthcare providers with critical access to financial and educational resources including grants, scholarships, information and training. Our Nurse Education Scholarship supports students at leading medical facilities, universities and colleges in Lancaster County and the surrounding region,” explains Anna Brendle Kennedy, LOHF Executive Director. LOHF nurse education scholarships support nurses in Licensed Practical Nursing, Registered Nursing, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing, as well as advanced degrees and certificate programs such as Certified School Nurse or Family Nurse Practitioner.

Recipients of the 2017 Nurse Education Scholarship

LPN Scholar:

Natasha Parker, Lancaster County Career and Technology Center

RN Scholars:

David Kinungi Kinuthia, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Katharine Elizabeth Noon Miller, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Bethaney Jean Shefton, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Starell Zoric, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Jacqueline M. Keener, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Sheila Champaign, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Emily Enid Cruz, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Kami L Dugan*, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Robyn Gill, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Alice Vivian Wheeler, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

RN to BSN Scholars:

Malinda Heisey*, Eastern Mennonite University

Brianna Shenk, Eastern Mennonite University

Danielle Lynn Sweigart, Millersville University

Leah Kossove, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Abrielle Minnich, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

MSN Scholars:

Leonie Mbiekop*, Millersville University

Lori Lynn Eichman, Millersville University

Beth Ann Russell, Walden University

Continuing Scholars

These nurse scholars continue to receive funding support as they pursue their degrees in nursing.

Awarded in 2016:

Heather Fickes, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Laura Noll, Harrisburg Area Community College – Lancaster Campus

Hannah Good, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

Alexa Hellein, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

*denotes a scholarship recipient who was previously supported by LOHF for their prior degree program

Reception

A 2017 Nurse Education Scholarship Reception is planned for September 20, 2017, 5:30 p.m. at Rock Ford Plantation, Lancaster PA. Light refreshments will be served. Guests are welcome. RSVP at info@lohfoundation.org or call (717) 397-8722.

 

Thank you community partners, donors, and volunteers. Let’s celebrate success highlights from the children’s behavioral health grant reports that just came in! These grants are achieving amazing outcomes!

Highlights

COBYS Family Services, Incredible Years Parent intervention program served 14 family members and 8 children at Brecht Elementary school. One parent said, “I love that we are not judgmental. We are using the skills we are learning.”

Samaritan Counseling Center, Teen Hope program served 7,400 family members, 1,897 children, and 140 community members. “We are actually getting teens at-risk for depression, anxiety and/or suicide to have an immediate conversation with a mental health professional. And the parents of at-risk students are having conversations with mental professionals about their child.”

Lancaster Public Library, Autism Resource Center served 2,700 family members, 1,700 children, and 1,500 community members. “Those who participated in the story times, who borrowed and continue to borrow the materials, and use the space–have been very appreciative and speak highly of the resource.” (See photo above.)

At CASA of Lancaster County, a Children’s Behavioral Health Coordinator is working alongside Lancaster County Children & Youth.

At Family First Health, Integrated Behavioral Health using Collaborative Care, 17 patients ages 13-26 received on-site behavioral health services. They presented with depression, anxiety, financial stress, parenting stress, relationship issues and difficulty maintaining employment. Many also have substance use issues.

United Way of Lancaster County, 2-1-1, a Resource Collection and Maintenance project with NavWell, added Lancaster County private behavioral health providers to 2-1-1.

WellSpan Philhaven, is training primary care professionals and pediatricians to use depression screening.

Thank you for helping us improve public health and well-being for children and families in Lancaster County!

We welcome grant applications for our Fall 2017 Children’s Behavioral Health grant program. Applications are due online by September 1, 2017.

LOHF recently hosted an informational event for organizations interested in applying for grant funds offered this fall. Below are several discussion questions and answers from our recent Grants Informational Session. View the full Grants Informational Session presentation materials here. Here are the questions and answers that came up during the session:

  1. How do we fill in organization history on the grant application if we are a new organization?

Any tax exempt organization that has an Employer Identification Number (EIN) is welcome to apply. When completing the organization registration form online, please include your EIN so that we can verify your organization’s tax exempt status automatically via Guidestar. If your organization uses a fiscal agent or fiscal intermediary, please provide the EIN for that organization.

  1. What if our financials show we have a high overall budget? Will it disqualify us?

Your overall budget will help us to better understand the scope of this project within your organization. A larger budget will not disqualify the application.

  1. What is the context for psychiatric consultation listed in the slide?

At LOHF, we are partnering with a behavioral health practice to begin offering consultative psychiatry services to primary care providers through our NavWell system. We have budgeted a small amount to cover these services as the NavWell pilot begins.

  1. We understand that letters of support are not required, but do you require a list of collaborative partners?

It depends on the design of your project. We do not require that you partner with other organizations, so letters of support are not required. However, we do encourage collaboration and partnership. If your project’s success depends on the partnership or collaboration of other organizations, then we do require letters of support from those partners.

  1. May we request a grant during both Spring and Fall grant cycles?

Yes, an organization may submit a grant request during either our fall cycle, our spring cycle, or both. We have also supported two different project requests from the same organization in the same grant cycle.

About the LOHF Children’s Behavioral Health Grants Program

LOHF targets support towards evidence-based programs that advance mental wellness of children and youth in Lancaster County. Our Children’s Behavioral Health Grants Program is a specific funding area that represents 26% of our annual program budget, with $100,000 total funds available annually, with the goal of providing more funds each year through fundraising efforts. Tax exempt community benefit organizations serving Lancaster County are eligible to apply.

In a study of Lancaster County healthcare needs, LOHF confirmed that child and adolescent behavioral health services exist, but care systems are fragmented. This leaves families overwhelmed and confused, and providers without tools to adequately refer families for therapy, counseling, and treatment.

With this information as a foundation, LOHF has built a grant-funding approach that invests in practical solutions to make children’s behavioral health information and services more accessible. The Children’s Behavioral Health Grants program targets support toward evidence-based programs advancing mental wellness of Lancaster County children and teens.

LOHF is positioned as a safety net, providing collaboration and resources for programs supporting parents, primary care providers and behavioral healthcare providers, nurses, and schools as they work together for the mental wellbeing of Lancaster County children and teens. Recognizing the current challenges of healthcare access—especially behavioral healthcare for children and teens—LOHF hopes to increase fundraising so that no child falls through the cracks. LOHF Children’s Behavioral Health Grants represent 26 percent of LOHF’s annual program budget, with $100,000 total funds available annually thanks to LOHF’s endowment and generous donors.

Tax exempt community benefit organizations serving Lancaster County are eligible to apply for LOHF grants, which are issued twice annually. Funded activities should focus on the following: care coordination, parent/caregiver education, and/or access (improving capacity of providers to treat children). To learn more, please visit: www.lohf.org/grants.

 

Leona, 58, never expected to be raising her granddaughter, whose parents are incarcerated in Lancaster County Prison. Her 10-year-old granddaughter wrestles with emotions of being separated from her parents. “I’m encased in a life without my parents,” she recently told LNP which highlighted their story. Thanks to The Family Services Advocate Program—facilitated by Compass Mark and partially funded by a grant from LOHF that supplements county funding—this family is receiving the support it needs, including visits between the jailed mother and her child.

The Family Services Advocate Program helps Lancaster County children of incarcerated parents heal and connects them to resources to meet their basic needs. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, children 5 years old and younger are most affected by trauma (including sudden loss of a parent or caregiver), and are more likely to end up in prison themselves without appropriate support. National studies prove that programs like this also reduce recidivism of parents.

Our Mission

When a parent is behind bars, the whole family is affected. That’s why LOHF is proud to support this program and others helping local children with behavioral health needs. LOHF is positioned as a safety net, providing collaboration and resources for programs supporting parents, physicians and behavioral healthcare providers, nurses, and schools as they work together for the mental wellbeing of Lancaster County children and teens.

“At LOHF, our mission is to strengthen behavioral health services for children and families so that all children and teens have access to healthcare—for mental health, substance use disorder, or behavioral health needs—as soon as possible,” Executive Director Anna Kennedy said. “The grants we provide help children and teens, their families, providers, and teachers. We invite all community benefit organizations to join us in learning about how we can improve children’s behavioral health for all families in Lancaster.”

Our Grants

Our Children’s Behavioral Health Grants Program seeks to strategically fund programs of tax-exempt community benefit organizations serving Lancaster County. Funded activities should focus on any or all of the following: care coordination, parent/caregiver education, and access (improve capacity of providers to treat children). Thanks to LOHF’s endowment and generous donors, $100,000 is available annually. Grants are awarded in the Spring and Fall each year.

We will host an info session with an opportunity to hear from current and past grantees, Executive Director Anna Kennedy, and to ask questions. The info session will be held this Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 9:00-11:00 a.m. at Rodgers & Associates, 2025 Lititz Pike, Lancaster. RSVP is requested but not required.

You may also learn more here about LOHF Children’s Behavioral Health Grants and how you can support the mission of improving behavioral health for children in Lancaster County.

Lancaster Osteopathic Health Foundation (LOHF) awards $32,500 in grants to improve access to behavioral healthcare and mental wellbeing for Lancaster County children and teens. Another $67,500 in grants will be awarded this fall.

Contact: Anna Brendle Kennedy, Executive Director
Phone: (717) 397-8722
E-mail: akennedy@lohfoundation.org
Address: 128 E. Grant St., Ste. 104, Lancaster, PA 17602
Website: www.lohf.org

Lancaster Osteopathic Health Foundation (LOHF) today announced that three nonprofits in Lancaster County were awarded grants totaling $32,500 to improve access to behavioral healthcare for children and teens in Lancaster County. The funds were awarded to Samaritan Counseling Center, Lancaster Public Library, and SouthEast Lancaster Health Services.

LOHF will host an informational event for those interested in applying for the additional $67,500 in funding offered this fall. This Grants Info Session will be held Weds., June 14, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m., at Rogers & Associates, 2025 Lititz Pike, Lancaster. RSVP is requested online at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lohf-grants-info-session-tickets-34890981866?aff=es2, or by phone, (717) 397-8722.

In a study of Lancaster County healthcare needs, LOHF confirmed that child and adolescent behavioral health services exist, but care systems are fragmented. This leaves families overwhelmed and confused, and providers without tools to adequately refer families for therapy, counseling, and treatment.

With this information as a foundation, LOHF has built a grant-funding approach that invests in practical solutions to make children’s behavioral health information and services more accessible. The Community Grant program targets support toward evidence-based programs advancing mental wellness of Lancaster County children and teens.

LOHF is positioned as a safety net, providing collaboration and resources for programs supporting parents, physicians and behavioral healthcare providers, nurses, and schools as they work together for the mental wellbeing of Lancaster County children and teens. Recognizing the current challenges of healthcare access—especially behavioral healthcare for children and teens—LOHF hopes to increase fundraising so that no child falls through the cracks. LOHF Community Grants represent 26 percent of LOHF’s annual program budget, with $100,000 total funds available annually thanks to LOHF’s endowment and generous donors.

Tax exempt community benefit organizations serving Lancaster County are eligible to apply for LOHF grants, which are issued twice annually. Funded activities should focus on the following: care coordination, parent/caregiver education, and/or access (improve capacity of providers to treat children).

“At LOHF, our mission is to strengthen behavioral health services for children and families so that all children and teens have access to healthcare—for mental health, substance use disorder, or behavioral health needs—as soon as possible,” Executive Director Anna Kennedy said. “The grants we provide help children and teens, their families, providers, and teachers. We invite all community benefit organizations to join us in learning about how we can improve children’s behavioral health for all families in Lancaster.”

Therefore, LOHF was pleased to award grants this month to support the following programs:

Samaritan Counseling Center – Teen Hope Program Research & Development
• Awarded: $15,000
• Will serve 6,400 family members, 1,600 children, and 200 community members
• Funds will provide research and development to advance the Teen Hope program
Teen Hope is a mental health awareness program for middle and high school students. The vanguard of the program is a screening to identify students at risk for anxiety, depression and suicide. The primary goal is to reduce suffering and disruption in the lives of teens. Teen Hope addresses the need to reach students who are suffering alone—unrecognized. Our intervention connects them with their parents and, whenever possible, with treatment.

Lancaster Public Library – Family Place’s Parent-Child Workshops
• Awarded: $7,500
• Will serve 1,550 family members, 750 children, and 10 community members
• Funds will be used to provide speakers, trainers, take-home items for families, and proper promotion of sessions.
Family Place Parent/Child Workshop is a 5 week program for babies, toddlers, and their parents and caregivers; features local professionals who serve as resources for parents; emphasizes the role of parents as the first teachers of their children; facilitates early intervention; and teaches strategies for healthy child development and early literacy. This creates the network families need to nurture their children’s development during the critical first years of life and helps ensure all children enter school ready and able to learn.

Southeast Lancaster Health Services – Reach Out and Read
• Awarded: $10,000
• Will serve 8,312 children
• Funds will be used to increase family competency
At routine health checkups from infancy through 5 years of age, Reach Out and Read providers:
• Talk with parents about how important it is to read aloud and engage with their young children
• Demonstrate how best to look at books and talk about the stories with their children
• Encourage them to cuddle up and read together at home and build routines around books
At the end of the program, every child has a home-library of books, given with advice to parents that they are their child’s first and most important teacher. SELHS tailors outreach to suit families’ specific needs. In Lancaster, this includes provision of additional languages to support our growing refugee population. This intervention is simple but powerful.

For additional information regarding grant opportunities through the Lancaster Osteopathic Health Foundation, please visit www.lohf.org/grants.

In September, we celebrated nursing in Lancaster County by honoring 17 new nurse scholarship recipients and 11 continuing nurse scholars. Since 2003, LOHF has invested more than $750,000 to educate 336 nurses who care for us and our loved ones in Lancaster County. We are especially grateful to the 35 donors who contributed almost $3,000 to nursing scholarships during the November ExtraOrdinary Give. Your generosity allows us to add two nurse scholarships in 2017. Meet our nursing scholars at lohf.org/category/nursing. 

 

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